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How Does Campaign Monitor Handle Duplicate Subscribers?

We often get asked if Campaign Monitor checks for duplicates when importing subscribers, so we thought we’d cover it here once and for all. The short answer, yes. We never allow duplicate emails to be imported into the same list and if someone tries to subscribe to a list that they already belong to, they won’t be added again. This way a recipient will never get the same campaign twice and you’ll never be charged for sending the same thing twice. Even if a recipient is a member of two lists and you send a campaign to both lists, they’ll still only receive one version.

Blog Post

Tip: Include Name in Your Subscriber Data

We know you’re not sending spam, but before your newsletter hits your subscribers inbox it most likely has to jump through a few pieces of Spam filter software making sure it isn’t. Here’s one quick and simple technique to make sure Spam filters don’t get the wrong idea about your email. When we’re sending out your campaign, we check if you’re storing the name of the subscriber we’re sending to. If you are, we include this in the To: address. Why’s this important? Spammers don’t know the names of their recipients, and filter software knows this, so if there isn’t a name and only an email address filter software will be more likely to give your mail a negative score. So when your importing subscribers, try to include their name, and it’s a good idea to include a name field in your subscribe forms as well (which is what we do by default).

Blog Post

Minimizing Subscribe Form Spam

Yep, you read that right. Not only have you got to worry about comment spam on your blogs, but your subscribe form could be the next target. We’ve had a number of customers let us know about this problem and have just made a small change to the subscribe form code to combat this. If you’re seeing any strange subscribers in your list (especially those that mention the .com domain in the email address), grab the latest version of the subscribe code from your account. We also updated the supplied signup code to include one with basic formatting, one with CSS formatting and a table based version. A big thanks to Ken Schafer from One Degree for helping us test this solution. Great guy and a great resource for Canadian marketers.

Blog Post

Best Practices for Sending to an Older List

Let’s say your client approaches you to send a campaign to Old Faithful, their house list that’s slowly grown over the years but hasn’t been contacted in 12 months or so. Hell, 12 months doesn’t sound that long. You put together the creative and start sending. Things start to get ugly The campaign’s sent. 40% of your list hard bounce right from the word go. Another 25% unsubscribe immediately. Old Faithful aint what it used to be. Problem 1: 30% is a big number Here’s a scary fact. Email address churn averages about 30% every year. This means that each year almost a third of your subscriber list will have moved on to a new email address. If you haven’t sent to your subscriber list in a while, you can see how quickly they can become out of date. Problem 2: Permission doesn’t age well Even if an old subscriber hasn’t changed their address, they might not even remember being added to your list. As web designers, we often forget that registering on a web site isn’t always a particularly memorable experience for most people. If you haven’t been in touch with a subscriber for more than 12 months, chances are the permission they once gave is now worthless. The solution – a permission confirmation campaign If your list hasn’t been contacted for at least 12 months, you should consider a permission confirmation campaign. This is a simple email that includes: An explanation of how, when and where they subscribed to your list. A compelling list of the benefits of continuing their subscription and a preview of what you’ll be contacting them about in the future. If you can’t say anything compelling then you shouldn’t be contacting them in the first place. A confirmation link the user must click to confirm their subscription. The best approach is to link to a subscribe form for a brand new list. Make life easier by using personalization to automatically populate the form with their existing details. Any subsequent campaigns should only be sent to the new list. Many will argue that this method will lose you a lot of subscribers. I say that if a recipient can’t be bothered to confirm their subscription, their unlikely to be opening, reading and responding to your campaigns anyway.

Blog Post

Reports Optimization and Speed Improvements

A number of customers with larger lists might have been experiencing speed issues with some of reports, especially the Recipient Activity Report. We’re constantly making small tweaks to our database to improve performance, but this update was a biggie. Thanks to a complete rethink of some parts of the database, you guys should notice significant speed improvements in the reporting section of Campaign Monitor. We’re rolling out a number of other improvements in the coming days, so stay tuned.

Blog Post

I Have Customers Who Have Subscribed to Multiple Lists, What Happens When I Send a Campaign to All T

Firstly, we remove duplicates for every campaign you send, so if a recipient is subscribed to multiple lists and you send a campaign to all of those lists, they will only ever receive one copy of your email. What about unsubscribes? If you send a campaign to multiple lists, and an individual is subscribed to more than one of those lists, they will be removed from each list if they unsubscribe from the campaign. If you send a campaign to a single list, and an individual is subscribed to multiple lists, they will only be removed from the list you sent to. They will remain in the other subscriber lists until they unsubscribe from a campaign sent to that list. This ensures your subscribers can join different types of lists, unsubscribe from one but still receive from the other. Also, when you upload subscribers into an existing list, all bounced and unsubscribed recipients WILL NOT be added to the list. We remember everyone that ever unsubscribed. The only way an unsubscribed individual can get back into your list is to subscribe again from your web site or if you manually change their status.

Blog Post

Quick Tip: Track Which Page Your Recipients Subscribe From

If you’ve got a subscribe form on more than one page on your site, Campaign Monitor provides a really simple way of tracking which pages or forms your subscribers are signing up from. Here are the steps: Add a custom field to your subscriber list called “source” (or something similar). Head into Create a subscribe form and make sure you select the new “source” custom field to be included. Save your changes and copy the supplied code for your subscribe form. Add the subscribe code to your site, but change the text for the source field from <input type="text" to <input type="hidden". Place this code on each of the pages on your site, and give the hidden field a value. For example, the front page could use value="frontpage" and the contact page could be value="contactpage". Every time someone completes these subscribe forms, they’ll be added to your list and the hidden form value will passed into the “source” field. This gives you an easy way to find out which pages on your site are converting the most subscribers.

Blog Post

Optimizing CSS Presentation in HTML Emails

This article is a sequel to one that appeared on A List Apart shortly after…

Blog Post

Quick Tip: Getting Additional Information from Your Subscribers

For a lot of our customers, placing your subscribe form on the front page of your site (or on every page for that matter) is an important method for encouraging as many people as possible to sign up. The only problem is, you don’t want to overload these pages with a bulky form, so you end up only asking for a name and email address. For a lot of you guys, this is enough. But if your interested in a quick and easy way to capture additional info and still keep a small form on your main pages, then read on. If you want to capture the extra details for every new subscriber, then you should change the subscribe form on the front page to submit to a second page on your site. This will then pass the subscribers name and email address in to the real subscribe form where you can capture all details. To make this work, you would pass the subscribers name and email address into hidden fields on the second subscribe page. This page would then use the supplied Campaign Monitor subscribe code (just change the name and email fields to <input type="hidden") and capture all the extra details for your subscribers. Once submitted, the user would then be redirected to your own custom confirmation page. It’s important to remember that unless the subscribers completes the second form, they won’t be added to your list.

Blog Post

Using Flash in Email Newsletters

I’m sure a few of you have come across this scenario before – you’re putting together a newsletter for a client and they want to jazz it up by adding some flash to the email. You might be left wondering, is that going to work?

Blog Post

Using Forms in HTML Emails

Sometimes it can be very handy to include a HTML form in an email campaign. Whether it’s a quick customer survey or a subscribe form for another list, they can be a good way to interact with a recipient right there in their email client. We even use them occasionally to get feedback off you guys. While they can be useful, there are a number of precautions you need to consider before using them.

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