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Want to Join the Campaign Monitor Team?

We’re looking for an experienced, Sydney-based designer to join the Freshview team and help our Campaign Monitor and MailBuild customers (that’s you guys) kick even more ass than you already are. The responsibilities will be varied, including working with customers to improve how they use our products, putting together helpful articles and flexing your design muscle across our apps and web sites. This position is perfect for a designer who is looking to get their hands dirty in other fields like building communities online and educating other designers. If you’re interested, you can get the full scoop on the Freshview site. While we’re on the subject, we’re also on the hunt for an experienced .NET developer and Windows sys admin. It’s exciting times in the Freshview office.

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Tips on Effective Segmenting

As many of you know, Campaign Monitor makes it easy to create segments of subscribers within a larger subscriber list. This makes it much easier to target specific types of subscribers based on their demographics, preferences, etc. While creating a segment is easy, choosing the right segments and executing on a good segmentation strategy is much more challenging. Stephanie Miller recently put together a whole swag of tips on the best approach to list segmentation, specifically focusing on capturing the right data during the initial subscribe process. Well worth a read if you’re currently segmenting, or looking for a good place to start.

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A Few Handy Plain Text Formatting Tips

We recently made a few subtle tweaks to Campaign monitor when you select the format you’d like to send your email in. We still present the same options – HTML only, HTML and text or plain text only – but we’ve tweaked the copy to encourage those sending HTML only emails to also include a text version. There are many reasons behind this. Including a text version can improve your deliverability, it looks much better when forwarded by many web-based email clients, and is a format some of your subscribers simply prefer. While your formatting options are obviously more limited, there are still plenty of do’s and don’t you need to observe when designing plain text emails. Stefan Pollard recently put together a few great tips on the best approach to formatting plain text emails that are definitely worth checking out. While you’re at it, take a look at Mark Brownlow’s tips for formatting plain text emails we published here back in December 2004. All his points are still very relevant today.

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Look for the Positives in Your Unhappy Subscribers

As you know, Campaign Monitor is directly integrated into the feedback loop for a number of large ISP’s like AOL, Hotmail, MSN, Juno, Netzero and a few others. This means that when any of your subscribers at these ISP’s mark your campaign as junk, we automatically remove them from your list and give you a detailed report about who made the complaint and when. Derek Harding recently put together an overview of how feedback loops actually work and there are two points we think he covered really well. The first is an explanation of why even the most well maintained lists can still see a few complaints. It’s important to understand that though your list may be 100 percent opt-in, it may still receive a substantial number of complaints. For years, end users have been told not to trust email unsubscribe links, so many users hit the spam button as a way of unsubscribing. While we do take action when a customer receives a significant number of spam complaints, we certainly realize that many of your recipients are just taking the easy way out or might not trust your unsubscribe link. Then there was this beauty. Too many marketers dismiss complainants as troublemakers and malcontents. The reality is there’s a wealth of data in who complains and what they complain about. Regardless of whether you believe the complaints are unfounded, if they complained they were dissatisfied. Smart marketers aim to avoid dissatisfied customers (or prospective customers). In my experience, the majority of complaints are caused by a failure to meet expectations. A common case is high complaint rates among new subscribers. This can be caused by subscribers not realizing what they signed up for, subscribers not getting what they thought they signed up for, or a long delay between sign-up and the first mailing. Just like the recent tips on getting the most out of your unsubscribes, there’s plenty we can learn from those marking our legitimate emails as junk. If you’re receiving complaints for any of your campaigns, it might be time to review your subscribe process and make sure you’re meeting and exceeding the expectations of your subscribers.

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Hardware Upgrade Problems

A few hours ago we flicked the switch on a big server upgrade including a significant hardware boost and a brand new database server. Unfortunately the process hasn’t gone as smoothly as we had hoped and something that should have taken 5 minutes is going to take much longer. At this stage, it’s very unlikely that we’ll have Campaign Monitor up and running before 6pm (CDT) this afternoon. We can’t apologize enough for this, and please rest assured that we’re doing everything in our power to get things running smoothly again. We’ll post updates here the moment we’re back online and you can access your account. UPDATE – 12.45pm (CDT) All sent campaigns should be displaying and working fine now. Link tracking is currently disabled but we’ll switch that on soon. In the mean time though, your recipients won’t notice a thing. We’re now working on your subscribe forms and will post here as soon as they’re back online. UPDATE – 1.25pm (CDT) OK, subscribe forms are back online now. This means your campaign recipients and any subscribers are no longer affected by this outage. Link tracking is also back online and we’re now hard at work getting the application itself available UPDATE – 4.45pm (CDT) We’re making plenty of progress bringing the application back online, but it looks like we won’t make our self imposed deadline of 6pm (CDT). As it’s coming to the end of the business day for many of you, we recommend waiting until tomorrow to get any campaigns out. A hardware problem managed to corrupt some recent data, so we’re treading carefully to restore this problem before we open the application up again. It’s tough to give accurate estimates on when this will be complete but we don’t want to promise any less than 6 more hours (12am CDT). As usual, we’ll be posting here the moment you can access your account and thanks again for your patience. UPDATE – 2.00am (CDT) Right now it looks like we’re less than 2 hours away from bringing the application back online. All of our hardware issues have now been resolved and we’re tying up loose ends before flicking the switch back on. Thanks for all the kind words we’ve been receiving too, your understanding is very much appreciated. More news to follow real soon… UPDATE – 6.40am (CDT) WE’RE BACK! Access to all accounts has been re-enabled and all the queued campaigns are getting delivered as I type this. We’ll be closely monitoring everything, but please feel free to access your account. We can’t thank you guys enough for the kind words of support and patience as we got to the bottom of this issue. We’ve seriously got the best customers in the world. UPDATE – 8.20am (CDT) While the application is back online and fully operational, the hardware failure did mean that a portion of our customers data needed to be restored from a very recent backup. Unfortunately this meant that anything added to those accounts during this window was lost. We’ll also be restoring some data to these accounts to fill in some of these gaps over the next 12-24 hours.

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Making the Most of Your Unsubscribes

Yesterday we highlighted some great tips for welcoming new subscribers to your list, so today we thought we’d look at the flipside. Stefan Pollard just put together some great suggestions for getting the most out of anyone leaving your subscriber list. As you know, Campaign Monitor requires a single-click unsubscribe link to be included in every email you send. On top of this, we also let you set up a confirmation page to redirect the unsubscriber to, and this is where Stefan’s tips shine. He writes… Instead of letting unsubscribers go with just a thank-you note, give them the opportunity to tell you why they’re leaving. You can use that information to sharpen the focus of your e-mail program, redo your template or send schedule, improve personalization, or find other ways to become more valuable to subscribers or customers. We especially liked these 2 suggestions: Include a form giving that gives them an opportunity to let you know why they unsubscribed, such as no longer interested, was sent too frequently, etc. If you have other newsletters on different topics or sent less often, give them the opportunity to subscribe to them instead. Out of any subscribers in your list, it’s the people who are leaving that can offer the best advice on what needs improving.

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9 Steps to Better Welcome Emails for New Subscribers

Mark Brownlow recently put together 9 common sense suggestions on ways we can all improve our automated welcome emails we send to new subscribers. As Mark explains… Somebody just felt interested and enthused enough about your products, services or publications to request regular emails from you. This is one of those precious marketing moments. You’ve got the prospect’s attention. You’ve got their interest. You’ve got their permission to send them email. And how do you communicate with them in this glorious, elusive moment? Unfortunately for many of us this is usually a pretty generic and boring confirmation email. Mark’s recommendations range from reminding them how often they’ll hear from you, giving an immediate feedback option and using conversational language. All great ideas. We’ve just updated the suggested text for the welcome emails in Campaign Monitor that embrace most of Mark’s suggestions. There are a few in there that you’ll need to add yourself though, like reminding them of the benefits of subscribing and rewarding them with some kind of treat. Check out the article and make the few simple changes to your welcome emails today.

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Free HTML Email Templates

We often get asked by new customers if we have any sample email templates they can check out to get started. We’re psyched to say, of course, we do! These email templates cover everything from a simple announcement email to an email newsletter and much more.   If you’re looking for some further inspiration to get the creative juices flowing, our design gallery has now grown to 100 awesome examples of emails from some of the best-known companies on the planet. Plus, we’ve got a helpful post on the 4 ways email templates make your email marketing better.

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Image Based Spam on the Rise

I’ve seen quite a few mentions about the growing problem of image based spam on the web and unfortunately in my inbox of late. I knew image-based spam was getting worse, but this statistic in a recent USA Today article blew me away: Image-based spam accounts for 21% of all spam, compared with just 1% in late 2005. It’s only a matter of time before spam content filters respond by coming down even harder on predominantly image based HTML emails. With the difficulties of coding a consistent design across all email environments, it’s little surprise that some designers are still opting for an image-heavy approach to their emails. With the continued popularity of email clients turning off remote images by default, and the continual tightening of content filtering rules, this just isn’t an option any more. This is another notch in the growing list of reasons why you should avoid heavy use of images in your HTML email designs.

Blog Post

A CSS Solution to Image Blocking

I’ve written a couple articles about using web-standards markup in HTML emails and am even speaking on the topic at an upcoming conference. But one area which I’ve failed to address is image replacement. I have found, read and learned from a handful of good articles/tutorials on the web about this topic. However, I believe they are missing some key components in their construct. And that’s what I will illustrate herein. I approach website markup with a set of techniques which I believe offer the best possible experience for everyone: smart, fundamental markup for those with outdated, graphical browsing devices; appropriate visual-design for those with standards-based, graphical browsing devices; and absolute content accessibility for those with slow connections, non-graphical browsing devices and screen readers. With that said, an area where I admittedly fall down is image replacement. Seeing one’s own design render with CSS on and images off is quite painful when the markup is standards based and all core-design images are CSS backgrounds. Moreover, accessibility is achieved only through a game of hide-and-seek. But there are some magicians from whom we can learn to overcome this. Standing on the Shoulders of Giants Dave Shea posted the most comprehensive study I’ve seen on image replacement. This is where I discovered what I feel is the best technique for preparing HTML markup for the CSS on, images off scenario. His technique sparked the realization that any inline element could be absolute positioned to commandeer the aforementioned scenario. So the techniques I’ll outline herein aren’t a significant evolution of Dave’s technique; they simply buff out a few scratches. They will also exhibit how one might use his image-replacement technique to tightly interweave images with their surrounding elements. With that, let’s look at the techniques I used in an email I recently designed and built for Digital Web Magazine. Image Replacement for Part of a Title Before I construct a website or HTML email I carefully read the content to decide how to semantically mark it up. I consider how it will look and read with no presentation layer. The title of Digital Web’s eNewsletter reads fluently as a single phrase: “Digital Web Magazine Updates Mailing List.” But there is a logo to consider, which is part of that title. I used a single h1 to mark up the title. Then I used a presentation layer to pull out the logo from the rest of the title. The results are as follows: [CSS on, images on] [CSS off, images off] [CSS on, images off] Using Dave’s technique, I created a container for the HTML text (in this case an h1) and added a single, unobtrusive span to house the image and to position it over the text: <h1><a href="http://www.digital-web.com/" title="Digital Web Magazine"><span></span>Digital Web Magazine</a> Updates Mailing List: February 26, 2006</h1> The CSS behind the presentation looks like this: h1 { width: 186px; height: 42px; position: relative; } h1 a { position: relative; width: 186px; height: 42px; } h1 a span { position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; width: 186px; height: 42px; background: url("https://www.campaignmonitor.com/assets/uploads/Logo.gif") no-repeat; } But I needed to position the latter part of the title so that it is not inadvertently masked by the logo. So I increased the total width of the h1, right-aligned the text, positioned the a tag to the left side of the h1 container and left-aligned the HTML text in the a tag which was to be hidden: h1 { width: 540px; height: 42px; text-align: right; position: relative; } h1 a { position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; width: 186px; height: 42px; text-align: left; } All done, right? Almost. Something that Dave’s technique doesn’t account for is increased font sizes. This technique places an image on top of HTML text that’s technically still displayed on the page. So when the font size increases, the HTML text pops out from behind the image. Remember that I was considering a scenario wherein CSS is still on, so I could safely bring down the size of that text so it would be well hidden even with increased font sizes. I also added a little padding to the a tag to increase my breathing room: h1 { width: 540px; height: 42px; text-align: right; font-size: 12px; line-height: 13px; position: relative; } h1 a { position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; width: 186px; height: 42px; padding-top: 23px; text-align: left; } With CSS on and images off the final result was a success, albeit less than satisfying from a visual-design perspective. This is because the hidden HTML text wasn’t formatted with the other content. If I was going to make this work with CSS on and images off, I wanted to go the full nine yards. So I added some color formatting to tie up the loose end: h1 { width: 540px; height: 42px; text-align: right; font-size: 12px; line-height: 13px; color: #999; background: #fff; position: relative; } With that, I had accounted for the presence and absence of graphics and CSS, and also for varying font sizes. Sweet! Relative/Absolute Positioning “What,” you ask, “is relative/absolute positioning?” Oh, it’s something really cool. And I found myself in a scenario that very much warranted use of this technique. I needed to break a single phrase into two lines as such: Powered by Campaign Monitor But I needed to mask the text on the second line with a logo without inadvertently masking the first line: With a simple evolution I could account for varying font sizes, which would otherwise destroy absolute positioning in this scenario. I started with the baseline setup (an h4 container with the extra span tag): <h4 class="Powered">Powered by <a href="https://www.campaignmonitor.com/" title="Campaign Monitor"><span></span>Campaign Monitor</a></h4> But this time I had to consider that the HTML text preceding the image could vary in size. So absolute positioning from the top would fail. Unless I used a relative increment. The following worked out great: h4 { position: relative; } h4 a { position: absolute; top: 1.5em; left: 0px; width: 121px; height: 15px; } h4 a span { position: absolute; top: 0px; left: 0px; width: 121px; height: 15px; background: url("https://www.campaignmonitor.com/assets/uploads/LogoCM.gif") no-repeat; } The key in this technique is the relative value of 1.5em for the top property in the positioning of the a tag. It is absolute positioned, relative to the font size. So the a container (and the image/text therein) will always reside a distance of one half of the height of the em size from the top of the parent container. This accounts for varying font sizes and adds a little padding between the preceding text and the image. Viola. Browser and Email-Client Rendering Aside from Yahoo Mail, most common email clients performed quite well using the aforementioned techniques. And all common web browsers also performed well. Following is a list of browsers and clients used in my tests: Email clients: AOL (webmail) EMail (Zaurus handheld) Eudora 6.2 (OS X, Win/XP) Gmail (webmail) Hotmail (webmail) .Mac (webmail) Mail 2.1 (OS X) Mozilla Thunderbird 1.5 (Linux, OS X, Win/XP) Outlook 2002 (Win/XP) VersaMail (Palm OS) Yahoo Mail (webmail) Web browsers: Blazer (Palm OS) Firefox 1.5 (OS X, Win/XP) IE 5.2 (OS X) IE 5.5/6.0 (Win/XP) Netscape 7.0 (OS X) Netscape 7.1 (Win/XP) OmniWeb 5.1 (OS X) Opera 7.0/8.0 (OS X, Win/XP) Safari 2.0 (OS X) The email clients with solid CSS rendering (Mail, Thunderbird, Outlook, etc.) properly rendered everything with images on and off. Those with poor CSS rendering (Hotmail, Gmail, etc.) displayed the masked text since they don’t display CSS background-images anyway. And the text-only clients successfully displayed the unformatted text. The only problematic email client is Yahoo Mail. This is because (as noted in my previous articles) Yahoo Mail replaces the property position with xposition,” which renders any positioning—and consequently the techniques outlined herein—useless. The good news is that it simply eradicates the images and displays the CSS-formatted text. An acceptable degradation in my book. As for web browsers, those with even moderate CSS support properly render pages using this technique. And those set to not display images see the CSS-formatted text. Awesome. So there it is. I hope my minor evolutions to Dave Shea’s technique help the web community with this less than desirable task. Thanks to Dave and the others from his article for their hard work in building such a solid foundation. This article was authored for Campaign Monitor by Mark Wyner of Mark Wyner Design, a small web design studio in Portland, OR, USA.

Blog Post

Tip: Should You Personalize Your Subject Lines?

Campaign Monitor makes it really easy to personalize the subject of your email with your subscriber’s name and email address. The big question is, should you do it? Here’s some nice research from MediaPost’s Melinda Krueger on some recent tests she performed on this very topic. The results were very positive. So positive in fact that every campaign that had a personalized subject achieved a better open rate and often click-though rate. But before you start personalizing every email you send, she also had these important words of advice: “Beware of forcing personalization. Gratuitous personalization can make you sound like a huckster and detract from your message and your brand. Even though these results are pretty impressive, this client did not use personalized subject lines 100 percent of the time.” Let’s also not forget that the option to even consider personalization depends on the quality of your list. There aren’t many bigger email marketing mistakes than to receive a personalized email with someone else’s name. Our recommendation. If you’re confident in the quality of your subscriber name data then try this for your next campaign. See if there was an improvement in your open and click-through rate and make a judgment call yourself.

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