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Responsive Email Support in Gmail Is Coming

We recently announced that we had worked on a fix for the lack of support for responsive design in email clients with the most prolific being Gmail. This lack of support by Gmail has long been the bane of our existence and many have shared their woes over the years. When we asked some of email marketing’s most influential players to make predictions about what this year had in store, Alex Williams predicted Gmail would fix its biggest flaw. That day is finally here. In a brief post on the Google Apps developer blog today it was announced that support for responsive email is coming to their email clients by the end of September. Later this month, you’ll be able to use CSS media queries with Gmail to ensure that your message is formatted the way you intended, whether it’s viewed on a computer, a phone in portrait mode, or a tablet in landscape mode. You’ll be able to change styles based on width, rotation, and resolution, allowing for more responsive formatting to optimize your email for every device. While the announcement focuses on responsive email support, which is huge news, this update actually goes far beyond that. Let’s break it down and look at what’s about to change for those that code emails. The end of inline CSS? The update actually includes a number of similar but distinct email clients: Google’s three webmail clients Gmail, Inbox, and Google Apps, Gmail on iOS and Android, and Inbox on iOS and Android. Lack of stylesheet support across all of these email clients (with a minor exception) has had us grimacing for years, and is the main reason why HTML email still relies so heavily on inline CSS. That’s all about to change with this update, which means inline CSS in email will largely be a thing of the past. What this means is that not only can you drastically reduce the file size of your emails. Eliminating the inlining step from your workflow will also shorten the path to a finished email. Support for media queries Along with the stylesheet support comes support for media queries – one of the cornerstones of responsive design. This lets you apply different CSS based on the email client width and height among other things. It’s almost 2 years since Google confirmed that responsive email support was on their roadmap, and we’re stoked to see them finally reach this destination. Meanwhile, Google’s lack of media query support has resulted in a number of hacks, including the hybrid fluid method and mobile-first emails. While we expect these techniques to continue to work nicely in Google’s updated email clients, it should be possible to clean these hacks up considerably once the new client versions are fully rolled out. Google will also be supporting other media query features like orientation, letting you optimize the landscape and portrait views of your email, and min-resolution, which is handy for applying retina assets. Documentation of CSS support Another big change for email developers is that Google now documents their CSS support in an online reference. This type of documentation is incredibly rare in the email client world, where we’ve resorted to tracking CSS support in email client ourselves instead. Their reference also indicates support for a number of properties Gmail has previously ignored, so we’re excited to try this out in practice and see which possibilities open up. What about interactive email? Something that’s not specifically addressed in their reference is whether the <style> support will also include support for :checked selectors. These selectors are commonly used for various interactive email techniques, so it’ll be interesting to see whether Google’s support for interactive email will improve. Wrap up Now that Gmail promises to make it easier to design emails that will look great across all their clients, more time will be available to focus on the many other aspects of email marketing. An update to this post is available.

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How to Write Better Preheader Text in Your Next Email Marketing Campaign

Using email preheader best practices can critically change the impact of your email campaigns. Grow…

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Introducing Campaign Monitor for Salesforce

To have the most effective and personalized email campaigns, you want to leverage the right information about your contacts. For hundreds of thousands of companies around the world, that data lives in Salesforce, the world’s #1 CRM application. So today, we’re excited to launch a brand new version of Campaign Monitor for Salesforce to give anyone using Salesforce a fully integrated email marketing solution, specially designed for them. This integration seamlessly connects Campaign Monitor to Salesforce so professional marketers can use all the tools they know and love from Campaign Monitor with the data from their CRM application to launch more targeted campaigns. Build your email campaigns right inside Salesforce Design custom emails using the drag-and-drop builder and a variety of pre-designed, mobile-friendly email templates to create a completely branded campaign right from within Salesforce. Effortlessly sync your contact and campaign data Built with a powerful, bi-directional sync, you can see all your Campaign Monitor data like what lists a contact is in or how they engage with your email campaigns, right on the Salesforce contact record. You can even manage how you segment and trigger your email campaigns from inside of Salesforce as well. Report on every aspect of your email campaigns With this deep integration, all the detailed reporting from Campaign Monitor is pulled into Salesforce so you can create reports and dashboards. Give visibility to both sales and marketing on how your emails are performing and driving revenue for your business. This integration is now available on the Salesforce AppExchange. Trial it free for 14 days then either stay on the limited features plan, or upgrade for premium features like custom field mapping, and managing multiple Campaign Monitor accounts from one Salesforce instance. To learn more, visit Beaufort 12’s Support Center.

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How to use UTM codes to track the success of your email marketing

There is nothing more important than tracking your email marketing. Learn how to use UTM…

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How to Drive More Revenue from Transactional Emails

Your customers get transactional emails every day. They receive them after signing up for services,…

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Beyond the newsletter: Introducing email automation

You know the magic of sending the right email to the right person, at the…

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8 Resources For Awesome Icons for Your Email Marketing Campaigns

Coming up with new imagery for every email marketing campaign can be tough.

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Introducing new transactional email for marketers

Account registration emails. Order confirmations. Cart abandonment emails. Password resets. We’re all familiar with these…

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4 Composition Tips for Killer Email Copy

We’re sharing the best tips for crafting email copy that wins over your subscribers.

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How to Advocate For the Value of Email Marketing

Answers to four common questions you’ll get about email marketing value, plus stats to prove…

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How to Send an Effective Marketing Follow-Up Email

Emails can provide your company with some of its highest marketing ROIs.Still, if your business is like most, you won’t receive the response you want after just one message. Instead, you’ll probably need to send at least one more before you get a positive result. That’s why you need to understand how to write an effective marketing follow-up email. Otherwise, the high-ROI you are expecting may never show up. Fortunately, there are 5 simple tips you can follow to quickly master this essential form of content. Any one of these will give you better results, but use them all from now on, and you’ll notice your email marketing campaigns really taking off. 1. Never send a marketing follow-up email too quickly. Kara Corridan has probably received more marketing emails than most. She was the health director of Parents magazine and is currently the executive editor of Scholastic. Here’s what she had to say about marketing emails that come too quickly: “Certain people that send me something on a Friday and then follow up Monday—it’s ludicrous. Even if we were interested, we couldn’t turn things around that frequently. You can try again in a month. Give us a chance to process.” That’s not to say you need to wait an entire month to send your follow-up. Every industry has its own standard. However, this is also why it’s important to figure out what makes the most sense in yours. Before deciding on the frequency of your follow up emails, first think about how you would feel receiving a follow up after you read the first marketing email from someone. How would you feel if the follow-up email hit your inbox a day or two later? Would you appreciate that or would you feel spammed? There’s a natural tendency to want to get in front of prospect often so many marketers will send emails too frequent in a sequence. Instead, make your send frequency at least 4–5 days apart. Give the recipient time to process the first email and decide whether it’s worth taking action before they receive another email. This takes time, but rest assured, there is no industry where following up every other day will get you the desired response. 2. Start with a reminder about your last email. Don’t start from scratch with a marketing follow-up email. Your prospects probably receive dozens of similar emails every week – if not more. After all, in 2017, 269 billion emails were sent every single day. So, there’s a good chance your recipient may not immediately recognize what yours is about. If that happens, don’t expect them to read it. Therefore, reference the last email you sent in the first line after your greeting. Don’t summarize it, though. On average, our attention spans are only about eight seconds, so never waste time with the openings of your email. Just reference the last one. If the reader needs a reminder, they can jump back into their inbox and find the last message. All you need is a sentence or two to reference the last one and then begin explaining why this next email is so important. 3. Get to the point. You’re not just checking in. Whatever you do, don’t begin your marketing follow-up email by “just checking in.” The benefit of those three words is that it makes it clear you’re not trying to pressure them into anything. The drawback is that you’re delaying why the email matters: its main objective. There are only four real reasons to write a marketing follow-up email: You need information You’d like to request a call, meeting, or some other kind of action You just want to catch-up You wanted to say thank you for one of the above or another opportunity Whichever it is, get to it right after you reference the last email. Don’t get lost in small talk. Remember, your recipient probably has a short attention span, and they may also be short on time—so start explaining why you deserve some of it. 4. Use action verbs. In a moment, we’ll cover how to end your emails, but before that tip will be helpful, you have to understand what must be included in the actual content. While you still want to keep your marketing follow-up email short, it absolutely must add value. You can’t simply send an email where all you do is ask for something. Instead, be sure you’re benefiting the recipient somehow, too. This is especially important in B2B, where data shows that 74% of buyers opt to work with salespeople who first added value. That is a massive difference. If your company utilizes account-based marketing, you’ll need to take the time to figure out what kind of value you can hope to provide the individual prospect. On the other hand, if your marketing follow-up email is going out to your entire list, be sure to segment it. Then, based on buyer personas, come up with a valuable piece of advice or other content that will show recipients that you’re focused on them — not just your company’s needs. Content upgrades can be great for this purpose. You can offer your recipients: eBooks Reports Case Studies Invites to a Webinar e-Courses Any of these options are above-and-beyond the normal follow-up email. However, because they come in the form of a link or attachment, they won’t add so much bulk to your copy that recipients immediately decide to move on. 5. End your marketing follow-up email with a specific call-to-action. Ideally, this marketing follow-up email will be the last one you need to send. To increase your chances of getting the response you want, be sure to include a specific call-to-action at the end. “Hope to hear from you” and “Let me know what you think” aren’t very good CTAs, despite how common they’ve become. Instead, consider one of the 75 CTAs we recommend. Here are some great examples: “Start your free trial” “Let us know how we did” “Reserve your seat” All of these give your recipient something specific to do. If you use action words throughout your copy, you’ll also set up your CTA with a better chance of success. Give your reader a CTA to be excited about If there’s one real secret to writing an incredible marketing follow-up email, it’s to always craft messages your audience will look forward to. Never send one out unless you know you’re offering them something they want—not just something you want them to do. That way, your recipients will actually be excited to open your email, read it through, and follow your CTA’s instructions. After that, you won’t need to send nearly as many follow-up messages, but those you do send out will have much higher rates of success.

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